Welcome

Welcome to the course web page for the Fall 2015 manifestation of MAT 136: Calculus I (Section 1, Honors) at Northern Arizona University. This course is a first calculus course concentrating on limits, continuity, the derivative, and integration. Applications are made to classical problems in physics and other sciences. Calculus is one of the great achievements in human history, and I am happy that I get to share it with you.

Detailed information about the course and its structure is available at the links above.

Instructor Info

  Dana C. Ernst, PhD
  AMB 176
  11:15-12:15 MWThF and 10-11 T (or by appointment)
  dana.ernst@nau.edu
  928.523.6852
  dcernst.github.io/teaching/mat136f15

Getting Help

There are many resources available to get help. First, I recommend that you work on homework in groups as much as possible. Second, you are strongly encouraged to ask questions in the course Google Group, as I (and hopefully other members of the class) will post comments there for all to benefit from. You are also encouraged to stop by during my office hours and you can always email me. Lastly, free tutoring is available in AMB 137 through the Math Achievement Program.


Dana C. Ernst

Mathematics & Teaching

  Northern Arizona University
  Flagstaff, AZ
  Website
  928.523.6852
  Twitter
  Instagram
  Facebook
  Strava
  GitHub
  arXiv
  ResearchGate
  LinkedIn
  Mendeley
  Google Scholar
  Impact Story
  ORCID

Current Courses

  MAT 431: Intro to Analysis
  MAT 526: Combinatorics

About This Site

  This website was created using GitHub Pages and Jekyll together with Twitter Bootstrap.

  Unless stated otherwise, content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International License.

  The views expressed on this site are my own and are not necessarily shared by my employer Northern Arizona University.

  The source code is on GitHub.

Land Acknowledgement

  Flagstaff and NAU sit at the base of the San Francisco Peaks, on homelands sacred to Native Americans throughout the region. The Peaks, which includes Humphreys Peak (12,633 feet), the highest point in Arizona, have religious significance to several Native American tribes. In particular, the Peaks form the Diné (Navajo) sacred mountain of the west, called Dook'o'oosłííd, which means "the summit that never melts". The Hopi name for the Peaks is Nuva'tukya'ovi, which translates to "place-of-snow-on-the-very-top". The land in the the area surrounding Flagstaff is the ancestral homeland of the Hopi, Ndee/Nnēē (Western Apache), Yavapai, A:shiwi (Zuni Pueblo), and Diné (Navajo). We honor their past, present, and future generations, who have lived here for millennia and will forever call this place home.